Dublin Meets Latrobe With Guinness Blonde

With ingredients from Ireland and America, Guinness Blonde is more than a beer – it’s melding of nations! As the beer continues to hit shelves around the nation, we compared Dublin and Latrobe – the two cities central to production. 


 


Latrobe, Pa.                                     


Population: 8,338


Area: 2.3 square miles


Notable Landmark: Latrobe Train Station, built in 1903, is on the National Register of Historic Places


Skyline Standout: Citizens National Bank of Latrobe was opened in 1926 and is the tallest building in the city at six stories


Favorite Sports Team: The Pittsburgh Steelers hold training camp in Latrobe each summer, which likely gives the Steelers the edge over the Pirates and Penguins


Notable Natives: Arnold Palmer, seven-time major-winning golfer, and Fred Rogers of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fame


Fun Fact: The banana split sundae was invented in Latrobe in 1904 at Tassel Pharmacy, and the city now plays host to the annual Great American Banana Split Celebration each summer


Contribution to Guinness Blonde: American hops (Mosaic, Willamette and Mt. Hood) and the facility where the beer is brewed


 


Dublin, Ire.


Population: 527,612


Area: 114.99 square kilometers


Notable Landmarks: St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Trinity College, Dublin Castle and many more


Skyline Standout: The Monument of Light, a 398-foot spire completed in 2003, stands on the same ground as Nelson’s Pillar, which was destroyed by an IRA bombing in 1966


Favorite Sports Team: Dublin’s top professional rugby club Leinster currently sits atop the European Rugby Club Rankings


Notable Natives: For the pop culture fanatics, U2’s Bono and actor Colin Farrell. For the wordsmiths, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw


Fun Fact: The famed Handel’s Messiah was performed for the first time on April 13, 1742 in Dublin, and the anniversary is marked each year with choirs as they perform excerpts


Contribution to Guinness Blonde: Guinness’ 125-year-old yeast, which is being imported to the U.S. for the first time exclusively for the Blonde American Lager


 


For more information on Guinness Blonde, click here

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